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Author Topic:   Trisha Brown Dance Company
Stuart Sweeney
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posted May 12, 2000 08:19     Click Here to See the Profile for Stuart Sweeney   Click Here to Email Stuart Sweeney     Edit/Delete Message

Trisha Brown Dance Company's Five-Part Weather Intervention (image: Chris Callis)


Deborah Jowitt has a great evening, courtesy of Trisha Brown and isn't that an amazing photo.


Seán Curran Company (image: Lois Greenfield)


she also enjoys the Seán Curran Company's Curran's, '....scruffy, fighting-cock vigor and fast feet—bred in ballet studios and Irish step-dancing competitions....'

Scroll down past NYCB to reach these two reviews:
http://www.villagevoice.com/issues/0019/jowitt.shtml

[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited May 12, 2000).]

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Jennifer
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posted May 12, 2000 12:55     Click Here to See the Profile for Jennifer   Click Here to Email Jennifer     Edit/Delete Message
Deborah Jowitt sums up Trisha Brown’s choreography and dancing with one simple phrase: "organized delirium of motion," as far as I could see from my seat in the Joyce last week. And I had a very good view. I mean, I appreciate the kinesthetic qualities in Brown's work AND the fact that Brown is a pioneer in her field, but I'm afraid it's not my cup of tea, as they say in England. I felt a bit like I was watching puppets being manipulated by their handcrafter. The dancers looked like clones of Brown's movements. I missed some show of emotion or sign of individuality. Sure, the dancer's movements, the colors of their costumes and the phrases they used in the music set them apart, but that was all. Men looked like women and women looked like me—the dancers appeared genderless. I have to admit I didn't get to see Newark though.

I won’t let this stop me from seeing more of Trisha Brown’s performances "live" but I can’t count myself as one of her fans. The beautiful thing is about modern dance though: there’s room out there for everyone!

------------------
[This message has been edited by Jennifer]

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Azlan
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posted May 12, 2000 22:43     Click Here to See the Profile for Azlan   Click Here to Email Azlan     Edit/Delete Message
You know, in some way, this reminds me of Merce as well...

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Stuart Sweeney
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posted May 18, 2000 01:27     Click Here to See the Profile for Stuart Sweeney   Click Here to Email Stuart Sweeney     Edit/Delete Message
Deborah Jowitt enjoys Trisha Brown's latest programme in this round-up article that appears elsewhere on this site.
http://www.villagevoice.com/issues/0020/jowitt.shtml

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Kevin Ng
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posted May 24, 2000 03:52     Click Here to See the Profile for Kevin Ng   Click Here to Email Kevin Ng     Edit/Delete Message
Trisha Brown's programme is reviewed this week by Tobi Tobias in New York Magazine. http://www.newyorkmag.com/page.cfm?page_id=3234

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Azlan
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posted April 08, 2001 15:05     Click Here to See the Profile for Azlan   Click Here to Email Azlan     Edit/Delete Message
Trisha Brown is coming to the SF Bay Area 4/27/01 and 4/28/01 in a production presented by Stanford Lively Arts.

You can also chat live with her on Voice of Dance on 4/23/01, 3pm US PST:

Chat Live with Trisha Brown

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trina
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posted April 08, 2001 16:31     Click Here to See the Profile for trina   Click Here to Email trina     Edit/Delete Message
Azlan, I agree. Although I recognize Merce's incredible contribution to dance: his unique approach to choreography and separation of dance and music, it's just not my "cup of tea". He has spawned a whole "school" of dance, and indeed strongly influenced the Judson Church group, if not directly, certainly indirectly. I seem to remember that John Cage was the teacher of the first few classes of the Judson group, then I believe Bob Dunn took over. ANYWAY, the dancers are beautiful, the choreography certainly surprising and unpredictable, but it just doesnt' speak to me, somehow. To each his own!!

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Azlan
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posted April 23, 2001 13:42     Click Here to See the Profile for Azlan   Click Here to Email Azlan     Edit/Delete Message
A reminder from our friends at Voice of Dance:

quote:
VoiceofDance.com and Stanford Lively Arts
present
Live Online Chat
with
TRISHA BROWN


Today! Monday, April 23
3 pm (Pacific Time)


Join a live conversation with Trisha Brown, choreographer and Post-Modernist icon. Trisha Brown Dance Company is performing El Trilogy and other selected works this weekend at Stanford University's Memorial Auditorium.


To enter the chat, go to:
http://chat.voiceofdance.com/eshare/server?action=4


Read more about Trisha Brown:
http://www.voiceofdance.org/Insights/insights.trans.col.cfm?LinkID=25000000000000063


For more on Stanford Lively Arts programs, visit:
http://livelyarts.stanford.edu/
See you on VoiceofDance.com !!


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Azlan
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posted April 29, 2001 22:50     Click Here to See the Profile for Azlan   Click Here to Email Azlan     Edit/Delete Message

Trisha Brown Dance Company
in "Newark"

In the first of two programs presented by Stanford Lively Arts, in Palo Alto, California, the Trisha Brown Dance Company performed three of their classic works, Accumulation (1971, Trisha Brown, Grateful Dead), M.O. excerpts (1995, Trisha Brown, Johann Sebastian Bach) and Newark (1987, Trisha Brown, Donald Judd).

All three works, while probably educational to the dance student and piquing the curiousity of ardent dance fans, bored -- and also annoyed -- most of the average dance-going crowd. Brown, who came out of the postmodern movement, still thrives to push the limits of what constitutes acceptable choreography. To many in the crowd, she overhit the mark and went beyond what was acceptable, especially in "Newark" where the buzzing sound irritated more than a few pairs of ears. After the first buzzing stopped, an audience member cried out, "Thank god."

Still, as with postmodernism, Brown's works can be appreciated on a sublime and mesmerizing level. But you have to let yourself get there. An open mind and perhaps some prior education are crucial to that goal.

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Azlan
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posted April 30, 2001 12:05     Click Here to See the Profile for Azlan   Click Here to Email Azlan     Edit/Delete Message
Allan Ulrich enjoyed the second program:

quote:
Trisha Brown gets an improvised kick out of 'Trilogy'
New York dancers startle and sizzle

Allan Ulrich, SF Chronicle

Trisha Brown's "el Trilogy," a tribute to the uncontrollable and improbable in dance -- and in life -- arrived, complete and uninterrupted, on the West Coast on Saturday evening at Stanford University's Memorial Auditorium, the windup to a weekend visit by the ever-startling New York postmodernist's sizzling dance company.


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Priscilla
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posted April 30, 2001 20:59     Click Here to See the Profile for Priscilla   Click Here to Email Priscilla     Edit/Delete Message
I'd like to see "Rapture to Leon James" again. I saw the premiere, but it sounds like the dance has settled into the dancers and the dancers more into the dance.

And "Five Part Weather Invention" - I dug. Would be nice to see this 'unbroken sequence' with the scene change/intervals.

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Azlan
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posted May 02, 2001 12:21     Click Here to See the Profile for Azlan   Click Here to Email Azlan     Edit/Delete Message
Anita Amirrezvani had problems though:

quote:
Jazzy `Trilogy' wears thin
IMPROVISATION IS STRONGER IN THEORY THAN PRACTICE

ANITA AMIRREZVANI, San Jose Mercury News

With ``el Trilogy,'' Trisha Brown continues the thoughtful experiments with dance that she began as a young, postmodern choreographer in the 1960s. Her latest work, which had its West Coast premiere Saturday at Stanford University's Memorial Auditorium, is a feast for the intellect but isn't always gripping to watch.


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Priscilla
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posted May 02, 2001 02:08     Click Here to See the Profile for Priscilla   Click Here to Email Priscilla     Edit/Delete Message
Part of why I said I'd like to see the "Leon James" piece again is because I didn't care for it much before. It's been a while since I saw it so I am reluctant to wax on too much about the whys and wherefores of why I wasn't lit afire by it. I do however recall hearing in the post-show discussion that they'd been up at the wee hours - 2 or 3am - to change the piece before that evening's premier. Once I heard that I thought 'no wonder the confidence in "Canto/Piano" and "Five Part" was diminished in "Leon James"'. I was hoping it had caught up. Every once in a while I get flashes of that evening and find something has stuck with me in a positive way, but I'm not sure what it is.

Interesting note - of the nine (terrific) dancers performing with Trisha Brown Dance Company at the time I saw them, I believe THREE were from Alaska! This came as quite a shock to me since professional dancers aren't one of our usual exports. Not like the rest of us aren't trying, but it was strange because no one I know knew about this until I came back with my program. Which I can't find now or I'd give names...

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Azlan
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posted July 08, 2001 07:42     Click Here to See the Profile for Azlan   Click Here to Email Azlan     Edit/Delete Message
Wendy Perron gives first hand account of the creative process of Trisha Brown and a preview of El Trilogy, her first jazz-based work:

quote:
Paying Heed to the Mysteries of Trisha Brown

WENDY PERRON, NY Times

...

Trisha is in love with the process of making and performing dances. The behind- the-scenes aspects fascinate her. In 1983, for "Set and Reset" (which became a masterpiece of the postmodern era), Robert Rauschenberg designed a partly transparent set that let the dancers remain visible after exiting the stage. For viewers, the separation of onstage and offstage was blurred. In the "Sticks" section of "Line Up," we talked to one another in performance not only to get our sticks connected up in one line but also to let the audience in on the game.


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Azlan
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posted July 20, 2001 10:17     Click Here to See the Profile for Azlan   Click Here to Email Azlan     Edit/Delete Message
A interesting review:

quote:
Interpreting Jazz for Ears, Eyes and Feet

JENNIFER DUNNING, NY Times

Trisha Brown at her best is poetic rapture shot through with teasing practicality. The "el" in "El Trilogy," her latest piece, appears to refer not to fandangos or elevated subways but to the length of the evening-long dance. Presented in its New York premiere by the Lincoln Center Festival on Wednesday night at the La Guardia Concert Hall, "El Trilogy" is also the inspired product of a two-year collaboration with the jazz composer and trumpeter Dave Douglas and the painter Terry Winters, who created the sets and costumes.


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Azlan
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posted July 24, 2001 12:40     Click Here to See the Profile for Azlan   Click Here to Email Azlan     Edit/Delete Message
Impressions from Deborah Jowitt:

quote:
Dancing to the Down, the Dirty, and Dave Douglas

Deborah Jowitt, The Village Voice

For the last six years, Trisha Brown has made dances to music; at one time the only sounds accompanying her choreography were footfalls, spoken commands, and the whoosh of flying bodies. She doesn't approach music compliantly, but invents structural analogies to what's going on with Bach or Webern or Dave Douglas, rather than galloping off on the obvious rhythms or melodies.


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Azlan
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posted July 29, 2001 18:59     Click Here to See the Profile for Azlan   Click Here to Email Azlan     Edit/Delete Message
The view by Wilma Salisbury of the Cleveland Plain Dealer:

quote:
Brown's "El Trilogy," also a highlight of the Lincoln Center Festival, was a fantastic achievement. The evening-length work coupled Brown's intricate postmodern choreography with vivid new music by jazz composer-trumpeter Dave Douglas.

More in the bottom third of the linked article

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Azlan
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posted September 25, 2001 07:15     Click Here to See the Profile for Azlan   Click Here to Email Azlan     Edit/Delete Message
A review from Ohio:

quote:
Trisha Brown dancers put on a seamless performance

Wilma Salisbury, Cleveland Plain Dealer

The Trisha Brown Dance Company of New York energized the Ohio Theatre at Playhouse Square Saturday night with the endless inventiveness of Brown's superbly structured choreography. A pioneer of postmodern dance, Brown creates movement as pure in content as absolute music or abstract painting.


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Marie
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posted September 25, 2001 09:07     Click Here to See the Profile for Marie   Click Here to Email Marie     Edit/Delete Message

Trisha Brown's El Trilogy

video excerpt 56k
video excerpt DSL

[This message has been edited by Marie (edited June 01, 2002).]

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Marie
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posted September 27, 2001 12:15     Click Here to See the Profile for Marie   Click Here to Email Marie     Edit/Delete Message

09.26.01 Review
Trisha Brown Dance Company [USA]
El Trilogy
Théâtre Maisonneuve, Place des Arts
Festival International de Nouvelle Danse

Choreography : Trisha Brown

Performed by : Kathleen Fisher, Sandra Grinberg, Mariah Maloney, Brandi Norton, Seth Parker, Lionel Popkin, Stacy Matthew Spence, Todd Stone, Katrina Thompson, Abigail Yager

Music : Dave Douglas


The Trish Brown Company opened their performance at the FIND with a solo from Claudio Monteverdi's opera L'Orfeo. It was a poignant and touching tribute to those who were lost or injured in the tragedy of September the 11th. Kathleen Fisher, as the messenger, danced a sombre reflection of the intense grief that has enveloped so many people. This solo was a heart-rending testament to the events that have so deeply affected us all.

Brown's El Trilogy seems like an answer to those who might be struggling to find moments of light after the dark days of the past few weeks. Her choreography is such a joyous and bright expression of how wonderful life can be. Dave Douglas' jazz score throws extra sparkles into the mix. The light-hearted mood is just so…American. The fresh-faced dancers, costumed in bright colours, move in a carefree style that is soft but articulate. They seem so wholesome; you can almost picture them drinking milk and eating oreo cookies after the show (a recent trend in NYC was after-hours milk and cookie bars). It's hard not to love them.

Five Part Weather Invention is a lot like the scribbles that cover the horizontal lines of the projection on the back wall. It's as if Brown is doodling with the dancers. A big swoosh here, a sharp line there. It's abstraction at its best, non-committal and unrestrained. The "follow the leader" section is playful improvisation that is reminiscent of a 1970's video using motion trails.

Rapture to Leon James was probably my least favourite part of El Trilogy. Maybe it's because I find little to relate to in a picture of Americana that is well before my time. This flashback to a happier era references the lindy-hop, with little wrist flicks and swinging circle skirts. It was sweet and saucy. One of the dancers receives a kiss during the piece, a gentle reminder of the innocence we have lost.

Groove and Countermove closed the show. The unpredictable moments: dancers falling and the audience realizing, to their delight, that the falls are choreographed, are what give this work its charm. It's loose-limbed and fancy-free with another kiss for good measure. Brown's dancers move in endless patterns that shift direction and intention at the drop of a hat.

The solo dances that occur during the two set changes were an interesting twist to the show. The first is angular and intense and it resulted in the audience errupting into applause at its finish. The second is a slow meander from position to position on an aluminium ladder, with long pauses from which to coolly observe the audience.

El Trilogy is optimistic and heartening. It's the kind of dance a lot people need to see right now.

[This message has been edited by Marie (edited September 27, 2001).]

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Marie
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posted September 28, 2001 07:38     Click Here to See the Profile for Marie   Click Here to Email Marie     Edit/Delete Message
Paula Citron - Globe & Mail, 09.28.01:
quote:
Lab experiments go kinetic

By happy coincidence, scheduling placed a French company, Quatuor Albrecht-Knust, and an American troupe, Trisha Brown Dance Company, on the same day.

If El Trilogy is Bloomingdales, Continuous Project/Altered Daily is Wal-Mart.



To read more search Paula Citron in the Globe & Mail's 7 Day Search

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